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Ford Truck Club Forum > GARAGE TALK > Garage Talk: Wheels & Tires



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  #11  
Old March 2nd, 2012, 09:08 PM
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good point
not only is rotation required for long tire life
but as tires wear having them balanced is also a good idea

Discount Tires rotates & balances my tires every 7,000 mi, free


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  #12  
Old March 3rd, 2012, 09:01 PM
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also depends on what size tire your running. Larger tires....especially a mud tire or one with an aggressive tread pattern will need to be rotated more often if ran mainly on pavement. Remember that these tires are meant to give and move for mud/dirt just like an ATV tire. Just my $.02.....

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  #13  
Old March 4th, 2012, 12:44 AM
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gotcha, they got to wiggle room


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  #14  
Old March 4th, 2012, 09:49 PM
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I check tire pressure every month - This saves me the most bucks especially with gas prices so darn high. Saves premo tire wear for sure!

For the car is 34# all around - the Truck with OEM tires - its 36# all around.

I rotate about every 10k. If i had softer rubber compounds i'd prolly think about doing it every other oil change.

When I pop off the tires i use the air compressor to blow the brake dust and then I use car soap n water and an old brush on the inside of the rims to get rid of dirt and mud build up. I figure it might help with tire/rim balancing and it sure does make it look purtty two!

When I'm putting everything back together - I make sure I give the wheel bolts a little wire brushing and a dab of antisieze before mounting and re-torqe.

I'm lazy... hate to do all that on the same day I'm changing oil and vehicle fluids. Besides there's only so many cans in a six-pac!



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  #15  
Old March 4th, 2012, 10:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HawaiianF150 View Post
. Besides there's only so many cans in a six-pac!
that could be the next New Mantra


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  #16  
Old March 4th, 2012, 10:04 PM
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I check tire pressure every month - This saves me the most bucks especially with gas prices so darn high. Saves premo tire wear for sure!

For the car is 34# all around - the Truck with OEM tires - its 36# all around.

In older style car tires - I used to see about 2# air pressure difference between front and back. For Utility Type Trucks - the back tended to have more air pressure. Cat and White could prolly speak better on that stuff than I can.

If I wanted less bouncing around on my trucks rear end - I'd let out about 1 to 2# psi of air out of the back tires to soften up the ride.

For me regarding normal tire rotations;

I rotate about every 10k since I have a slightly harder (longer life tires aka... 60,000 miles or 500% Treadlife or more) rubber compound. If I had softer rubber compounds I'd prolly think about doing it every other oil change.

This prolly might not make sense and start a flurry of discussions ( Kool!!) - to a simple mind like mine, I use this as a tire useage and buying guide gauge.

Lower Treadlife (300 to 400 or less) rating with higher Traction (Traction A) rating with a higher Speed Speed (T or higher) rating equals an easy way to know the tire is made of softer and fasting wearing rubber compounds. Did I forget to mention tire cost and smaller sidewall rim to ground tire clearance and directionally specific tire designs? Dangit~!~

When I pop off the tires i use the air compressor to blow the brake dust and then I use car soap n water and an old brush on the inside of the rims to get rid of dirt and mud build up. I figure it might help with tire/rim balancing and it sure does make it look purtty two!

When I'm putting everything back together - I make sure I give the wheel bolts a little wire brushing and a dab of antisieze before mounting and re-torqe.

I'm lazy... hate to do all that on the same day I'm changing oil and vehicle fluids. Besides there's only so many cans in a six-pac!



What we leave behind are our words and our deeds. Nothing else really matters.






Last edited by HawaiianF150; March 4th, 2012 at 10:08 PM.
  #17  
Old March 4th, 2012, 10:07 PM
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Gotta love the Request timed out thingy dohickey whachamacallit!!

i redid the post so much for copy paste huh!!!
second post is better



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  #18  
Old March 5th, 2012, 09:14 AM
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Rick, Good point on the tread wear rating on tires
something most may not know about and more so that most dont even look at

YES, you can find a rating for the wear aspect of your tires
It is embossed on the sidewall usually next to the Traction Rating, yep they tell you that also

The Tread Wear rating is a numerical guidline set by the powers to be that watch out for the consumer
the lower the number the quicker the tire will wear out, and the higher the number the longer that tire will be around.

sounds like food for another CONTENT thread
maybe I can convince RUSSO to take this on, now that he has so much time on his hands during Spring Break


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Last edited by JSoko; March 5th, 2012 at 09:16 AM.
  #19  
Old March 5th, 2012, 07:28 PM
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I have less time now, good try.


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  #20  
Old March 7th, 2012, 12:52 AM
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Russo - I did a topic thread back in January might help out your thread a tad.

http://www.fordtruckclub.net/forum/s...bers#post49990

Here is some more info;

The DOT Code
The DOT code is used by the Department of Transportation (DOT) to track tire production for recall purposes. If a tire proves to be defective, this number helps keep track of where these tires ended up so that buyers can be notified of the problem. At the end of the DOT code you'll find a four-digit number. This is the manufacturing date of the tire. The first two digits stand for the week; the other two are the year. For example, if your tire had "1610" listed, it was manufactured on the 16th week of 2010.

If you come across a three-digit number, you have a tire that was manufactured before 2000. A DOT tire code of "127" indicates the tire was made on the 12th week of the seventh year of the decade. But it's difficult to know whether that was 1997 or even 1987. According to tirerack.com, some tires produced in the 1990s may have a small triangle following the DOT number to identify the decade. But any tire that has a three-digit code is history. Tire experts recommend that tires that are six or more years old be replaced, regardless of tread depth.

Sometimes the DOT number will be located on the inside of the tire. In this case, you can either jack up the car to inspect it, or check with your local mechanic or tire shop. You should also make a habit of checking the manufacturing date on your spare tire as well.

A special note!! This is one of the most important numbers to consider when you buy tires. Reason being tire rubber can start to crack at about five (5) years of age after it is made. Why buy a three year old rubber tire only to find out that at half its useable tread you see cracks!!

Tire Speed Rating;
The speed rating is a measurement of the speed at which the tire is designed to run for extended periods. An "H" speed rating signifies that this tire can be run safely at speeds of up to 130 mph for extended periods. Will it explode if it goes to 140? No, not immediately. But it might if it is run at that speed for an extended time.


S 112 mph
T 118 mph
U 124 mph
H 130 mph
V 149 mph

Tire ratings generally considered (and usually over priced for us regular users) typically as racing tires;
Z Over 149 mph
W 168 mph
Y 186 mph
(Y) Over 186 mph
The "Z" rating used to be the highest rating for tires having a maximum speed capability greater than 149 mph, but as tire technology improved, it is was ultimately split into the "W" and "Y" rating. A "ZR" may sometimes appear in the size designation, as a sort of nod to the prior rating, but it will also be used in conjunction with a W or a Y.


Tire Service Description;
The service description may not always appear on the tire, but it is important to know how it can affect your vehicle. If there is a "P" on the sidewall, it stands for "passenger car." This refers to the U.S. (P-metric) method of tire sizing. "LT" stands for Light Truck. "ST" is for "Special Trailer." And "T" stands for "Temporary," which is primarily used for small spare tires. If a tire does not have a "P" or another letter in front of the numbers, it is considered a "Euro-metric" tire. A Euro Metric tire conforms to the European tire specifications, and often carries a different load index than a comparably sized P-metric tire.

Tire Width
The first number in this series refers to the tire's section width, or distance from sidewall edge to sidewall edge (in millimeters) when measured up and over the tire's tread. Generally speaking, the larger this number is, the wider the tire will be.

Aspect Ratio
This number is the tire's aspect ratio, or its section height compared to its section width. In this example, the section (or sidewall) height is 65 percent of the section width. This number can be very indicative of a tire's purpose. Lower numbers, like 55 or less, mean a short sidewall for improved steering response and better overall handling.

Internal Construction
The "R" refers to radial construction, which has been the industry standard in passenger-car tires for more than 20 years. Prior to radial tires, most cars came with bias-ply tires, which had a crude construction that made for poor handling. Bias-ply tires (which use a "B" for their description) are still used for certain truck applications.



What we leave behind are our words and our deeds. Nothing else really matters.






Last edited by HawaiianF150; March 10th, 2012 at 01:32 PM.
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