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Ford Truck Club Forum > FORD F-250 | F-350 SERIES | SUPER DUTY > 1948-1986 Ford F250 | F350



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  #1  
Old December 20th, 2010, 06:22 PM
Per-Arne Hauglund's Avatar
Per-Arne Hauglund Per-Arne Hauglund is offline
 

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Question dana gear ratio

Hi Everybody
I live in norway and bought an F250 76 mod 4x4 with an 460 engine and C6 transmission Np 203 divorced transfercase 2 years ago.
It has an Dana 44 in front and Dana 60 in the rear
And i wonder if anyone can help me with the gear ratio is std for this car
What ratio is the lowest possisble for this combination?

The engine runs at approx 3000rpm at 60mph with 35 inches tires.

Can anyone help me?

Per-Arne
  #2  
Old December 20th, 2010, 07:43 PM
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WELCOME to Norway

we have a few Dana specialist here on the site, give them some time.
I know some of that info can be found in the VIN# on later models, but I do belive you'll have to look for a metal tag thats usually attached to one of the bolts for the diff. cover, which can be deciphered

I sure would like to see some pictures of your truck with some Norway scenery

oh, sorry to hear about the divorce


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Last edited by JSoko; December 20th, 2010 at 07:47 PM.
  #3  
Old December 20th, 2010, 09:57 PM
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Welcome, as JSoko said, there should be a metal tag under one of the differential cover bolts. Please post the numbers that you see. Sounds like you may have a 4.56 gear set.

Here is our very own gear ratio guide to help you out: FTC Gear Ratio Guide




  #4  
Old December 21st, 2010, 02:12 AM
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From the looks of it you have 4.56's.

i put the info into an advanced calculater and heres what i found.

WITH 4.10's
* Your final drive ratio is
(with t-case in high)

first gear: 10.09
second gear: 5.99
third gear: 4.10

(with t-case in low)
first gear: 20.17
second gear: 11.97
third gear: 8.20

Now with 4.10 gearing your RPMS at 60mph would only be 2,495 RPMS

So if you are running at close to 3,000 RPMS at 60 that means you have lower gears than 4.10's which was a very popular gear for stock trucks back in the day.

So lets imput a lower gear, i redo the calculations with 4.56 gearing come up with this

WITH 4.56's
* Your final drive ratio is
(with t-case in high)

first gear: 11.22
second gear: 6.66
third gear: 4.56

(with t-case in low)
first gear: 22.44
second gear: 13.32
third gear: 9.12

Now with 4.56 gearing your RPMS at 60mph would be 2,775 RPMS alot closer to that 3,000 mark that you said

Now just for quality control sake, ill imput one more setup thats even lower

WITH 4.88's
* Your final drive ratio is
(with t-case in high)

first gear: 12.00
second gear: 7.12
third gear: 4.88

(with t-case in low)
first gear: 24.01
second gear: 14.25
third gear: 9.76

Now with 4.88 gearing your RPMS at 60mph would be 2,970 RPMS, which is dead on the stick with 3,000rpm claim. But to me 100% sure you will have to check the tag on the axle. You can also take the cover off the axle and most of the time their is a stamped ratio on the ring gear. If thats not there you can count the number of teeth on the ring gear and divide that by the number of teeth on the pinion

Hope this helps


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  #5  
Old December 21st, 2010, 10:24 AM
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I recall a method we used back when.
you jack the rear end off the ground, put a mark on the tire and one on the drive shaft
now rotate the tire one complete revolution while counting the number of revolutions the drive shaft turned.
does anyone else know about this and how to do the math
I did it many years ago on a F100 and the math supported a 2.73 ratio, which in deed it had
my memory is some what cloudy on this


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  #6  
Old December 21st, 2010, 12:43 PM
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Locate the Truck Safety Compliance Certification Label on the door pillar near the door latch.
Locate the two-digit code in the box labeled "AXLE," which is just below the bar code.

now somone needs to tell us what that code means


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  #7  
Old December 21st, 2010, 12:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsoko View Post
I recall a method we used back when.
you jack the rear end off the ground, put a mark on the tire and one on the drive shaft
now rotate the tire one complete revolution while counting the number of revolutions the drive shaft turned.
does anyone else know about this and how to do the math
I did it many years ago on a F100 and the math supported a 2.73 ratio, which in deed it had
my memory is some what cloudy on this
heres how to do it the old fashion way

If you turn one tire & the other one either stays still while the pinion rotates, or the other one rotates backward while the pinion stays still, or something in between, then you've got an open diff or a very weak LSD (like a Trac-Lok with too many miles on it). In this case, you need to secure one wheel (perhaps by lowering the tire onto the ground), then you can figure your gear ratio by rotating the airborne tire TWO full rotations and counting the number of times the pinion rotates. 4.56 turns means 4.56 gears. If you only rotate the tire once, then 2.28 turns means 4.56 gears.
If you turn one tire & the other one turns the same number of turns in the same direction, then you've got a good LSD or locker. In this case, you can just rotate the tires ONE full rotation and figure your gear ratio by counting the number of times your pinion rotates. 4.56 turns means 4.56 gears.

heres how they do it in Alabama
raise both wheels
Duct tape the string end of the plumb bob to the fender above the tire, so that so the string lines up with the center of the wheel. Mark the tire beneath the string with the grease pencil so the two line up.

Clean the drive shaft with solvent, and mark it and the differential housing with a grease pencil to create alignment marks.

Measure the drive-shaft circumference in cm and note your measurement.

Have one assistant hold the unmarked wheel (if you're using an open differential), while the other rotates the marked wheel counterclockwise until the reference mark comes back around to rest beneath string.

Count the number of times the drive-shaft reference mark passes the reference mark on the differential housing. The drive-shaft mark will pass the differential mark on the last revolution and come to rest past it.

Use a tape to measure the distance between the differential reference mark and drive-shaft mark in the direction of rotation.

Divide this measurement by the circumference of the drive-shaft, and add the whole revolution number, as in this example:

Drive-shaft circumference: 10 cm
Whole revolutions: 3
Distance past diff reference mark: 4 cm

10/4 = .25

3 + .25 = 3.25

Axle ratio = 3.25 to 1


(I suspect you have a 4.10 or 4.56)


If you dont mind making a mess do this, this is the most accurate way

remove the diff cover,
count the teeth on the ring gear and devide it by the number of teeth on the pinion gear.
you cant go wrong with this

but that tag sure makes things easier if its still there


For Those Who Fought For It...
Freedom Has A Taste The Protected Will Never Know.













Last edited by JSoko; December 21st, 2010 at 01:22 PM.
  #8  
Old December 21st, 2010, 02:18 PM
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DIXIE FIX DIXIE FIX is offline
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by jsoko View Post
heres how to do it the old fashion way

If you turn one tire & the other one either stays still while the pinion rotates, or the other one rotates backward while the pinion stays still, or something in between, then you've got an open diff or a very weak LSD (like a Trac-Lok with too many miles on it). In this case, you need to secure one wheel (perhaps by lowering the tire onto the ground), then you can figure your gear ratio by rotating the airborne tire TWO full rotations and counting the number of times the pinion rotates. 4.56 turns means 4.56 gears. If you only rotate the tire once, then 2.28 turns means 4.56 gears.
If you turn one tire & the other one turns the same number of turns in the same direction, then you've got a good LSD or locker. In this case, you can just rotate the tires ONE full rotation and figure your gear ratio by counting the number of times your pinion rotates. 4.56 turns means 4.56 gears.

heres how they do it in Alabama
raise both wheels
Duct tape the string end of the plumb bob to the fender above the tire, so that so the string lines up with the center of the wheel. Mark the tire beneath the string with the grease pencil so the two line up.

Clean the drive shaft with solvent, and mark it and the differential housing with a grease pencil to create alignment marks.

Measure the drive-shaft circumference in cm and note your measurement.

Have one assistant hold the unmarked wheel (if you're using an open differential), while the other rotates the marked wheel counterclockwise until the reference mark comes back around to rest beneath string.

Count the number of times the drive-shaft reference mark passes the reference mark on the differential housing. The drive-shaft mark will pass the differential mark on the last revolution and come to rest past it.

Use a tape to measure the distance between the differential reference mark and drive-shaft mark in the direction of rotation.

Divide this measurement by the circumference of the drive-shaft, and add the whole revolution number, as in this example:

Drive-shaft circumference: 10 cm
Whole revolutions: 3
Distance past diff reference mark: 4 cm

10/4 = .25

3 + .25 = 3.25

Axle ratio = 3.25 to 1


(I suspect you have a 4.10 or 4.56)


If you dont mind making a mess do this, this is the most accurate way

remove the diff cover,
count the teeth on the ring gear and devide it by the number of teeth on the pinion gear.
you cant go wrong with this

but that tag sure makes things easier if its still there
did you even read my post


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  #9  
Old December 21st, 2010, 04:16 PM
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Per-Arne Hauglund Per-Arne Hauglund is offline
 

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Thanks for all the replies
This forum is realy good
I think I will try to compare the number rotation of the wheel on one turn of the pinion.

Per-Arne
  #10  
Old December 22nd, 2010, 12:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DIXIE FIX View Post
did you even read my post
yes and your last sentance was dead on
I just want to say it again as reinforcement


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