Quantcast What Does The Check Engine Light Mean? - Ford Truck Club Forum




Home






Forum






Gallery






Garage






Blog






Arcade






Settings






New Posts






TOTM






Vote




Remember Me?
       Join for free!




Search






How-To's






Unanswered






FTC Toolbar






Social Sites






Register




 
Ford Truck Club Forum > GARAGE TALK > Garage Talk: Shop Class 101



Welcome to FordTruckClub.net
Welcome to FordTruckClub.net, the internet's premier Ford truck community! You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view discussions and access other forum features. By joining our free online community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

Forgot your password? click here.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old May 5th, 2011, 09:47 AM
JSoko's Avatar
JSoko JSoko is offline

 

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 15,010
Images: 629
Likes : 34
Liked 187 Times in 169 Posts
Exclamation What Does The Check Engine Light Mean?

What Does The Check Engine Light Mean?
That little light can mean a lot of things. How do you know if it's a serious problem or just a small issue?

One day, this might happen to you, you glance down at your vehicle's dashboard only to see the check engine light turned on. You burst into a cold sweat wondering just how badly your car's engine needs to be checked.


If your car doesn't sound like there is a monkey swinging a hammer under your hood and your vehicle is not billowing smoke, you're probably not in immediate danger. The check engine light, or malfunction indication light, as it's known to the auto elite, is designed to keep the driver informed of any number of sensor failures or engine irregularities.


As automotive environmental standards became stricter throughout the 1980s, onboard engine monitoring became more and more complex. Today, a variety of sensors feed your vehicle's computer information on everything from ambient air temperature to the amount of oxygen in the car's exhaust gasses.


The vehicle's onboard computer, or engine control unit (ECU), then makes adjustments to ensure that the engine is running as efficiently, and cleanly, as possible in the given conditions. When one of those sensors fail, or gets a strange reading, you get the dreaded amber light of doom. So what do you do?


First, save the cold sweats for your yearly review with the boss. Second, go ahead and get it checked out. A technician will use a code reader - plugging it into your car's data port - that will display a numerical code that can be referenced to diagnose your car's problem. Most times the cross-referenced descriptions are less than helpful to a DIYer. You may get "fuel supply system" as the cause of your troubles. Unfortunately, the fuel supply system on most vehicles is made up of a slew of parts, and choosing to replace each and every one until you hit the trouble spot would be costly. Luckily, an experienced technician can decipher your car's woes.


Occasionally, there may be a simple solution to your check engine light dilemma, and these are things you can check yourself. Failing to tighten your gas cap all the way, not fully seating your engine oil dipstick or a loose oil fill cap can all cause the check engine light to flash. If you check all of the above and you're still stuck with a little extra amber on your dash, pay a visit to your mechanic.


If you haven't noticed any huge drop in performance when the light comes on, you can probably get away with putting off your check up for awhile. Don't take too long though, as the light may indicate the beginnings of a much more serious problem.


Even if that's not the case, not addressing the issue will inevitably lead to a failed emissions inspection and you bumming a ride from coworkers. Pull that piece of electrical tape off of the light, and get it taken care of.

That little light can mean a lot of things. How do you know if it's a serious problem or just a small issue?


One day, this might happen to you, you glance down at your vehicle's dashboard only to see the check engine light turned on. You burst into a cold sweat wondering just how badly your car's engine needs to be checked.

If your car doesn't sound like there is a monkey swinging a hammer under your hood and your vehicle is not billowing smoke, you're probably not in immediate danger. The check engine light, or malfunction indication light, as it's known to the auto elite, is designed to keep the driver informed of any number of sensor failures or engine irregularities.

As automotive environmental standards became stricter throughout the 1980s, onboard engine monitoring became more and more complex. Today, a variety of sensors feed your vehicle's computer information on everything from ambient air temperature to the amount of oxygen in the car's exhaust gasses.

The vehicle's onboard computer, or engine control unit (ECU), then makes adjustments to ensure that the engine is running as efficiently, and cleanly, as possible in the given conditions. When one of those sensors fail, or gets a strange reading, you get the dreaded amber light of doom. So what do you do?

First, save the cold sweats for your yearly review with the boss. Second, go ahead and get it checked out. A technician will use a code reader - plugging it into your car's data port - that will display a numerical code that can be referenced to diagnose your car's problem. Most times the cross-referenced descriptions are less than helpful to a DIYer. You may get "fuel supply system" as the cause of your troubles. Unfortunately, the fuel supply system on most vehicles is made up of a slew of parts, and choosing to replace each and every one until you hit the trouble spot would be costly. Luckily, an experienced technician can decipher your car's woes.

Occasionally, there may be a simple solution to your check engine light dilemma, and these are things you can check yourself. Failing to tighten your gas cap all the way, not fully seating your engine oil dipstick or a loose oil fill cap can all cause the check engine light to flash. If you check all of the above and you're still stuck with a little extra amber on your dash, pay a visit to your mechanic.

If you haven't noticed any huge drop in performance when the light comes on, you can probably get away with putting off your check up for awhile. Don't take too long though, as the light may indicate the beginnings of a much more serious problem.

Even if that's not the case, not addressing the issue will inevitably lead to a failed emissions inspection and you bumming a ride from coworkers. Pull that piece of electrical tape off of the light, and get it taken care of.


Five Signs There Is No Serious Problem
Your car seems to be behaving normally
No strange noises
No smoke
No strange smell
You're getting the same gas mileage


Five Signs There Could Be A Serious Problem
A consistent rattle, knock or other unusual noise
Smoke
A severe loss of power
A serious decline in gas mileage
The vehicle does not start


For Those Who Fought For It...
Freedom Has A Taste The Protected Will Never Know.













Last edited by JSoko; May 6th, 2011 at 08:20 AM.
  #2  
Old May 5th, 2011, 09:13 PM
whitesleeper's Avatar
whitesleeper whitesleeper is offline
 

Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: milford ohio
Posts: 374
Likes : 2
Liked 4 Times in 3 Posts
Default check



Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


(View-All Members who have read this thread : 6
Fozzi89 , HawaiianF150 , JSoko , nine5flareside , Scotts Black FX4 , whitesleeper

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Ford Check Engine Light nine5flareside Garage Talk: General Tech Talk 0 November 3rd, 2009 10:06 PM

Tags
check , engine , light

Forum Jump









FordTruckClub.net is not authorized, endorsed or affiliated with the Ford Motor Company
or any of their subsidiaries. Ford® is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6 Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.