Quantcast Tire Tread Life - Ford Truck Club Forum




Home






Forum






Gallery






Garage






Blog






Arcade






Settings






New Posts






TOTM






Vote




Remember Me?
       Join for free!




Search






How-To's






Unanswered






FTC Toolbar






Social Sites






Register




 
Ford Truck Club Forum > GARAGE TALK > Garage Talk: Wheels & Tires



Welcome to FordTruckClub.net
Welcome to FordTruckClub.net, the internet's premier Ford truck community! You are currently viewing our boards as a guest which gives you limited access to view discussions and access other forum features. By joining our free online community you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is fast, simple, and absolutely free so please, join our community today!

Forgot your password? click here.

Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 

 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 6th, 2014, 08:57 AM
JSoko's Avatar
JSoko JSoko is offline

 

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 15,010
Images: 629
Likes : 34
Liked 187 Times in 169 Posts
Exclamation Tire Tread Life

The Truth About Tread Life
Tires are designed with treads that provide your vehicle with traction. This traction keeps your car driving along the road - even in inclement weather. Without tread, the elements would literally lift your tires off the road. When you drive through snow or a puddle, the grooves in between the tread blocks of the tires become channels that divert the water or snow away from the tires, allowing the tires to maintain traction in these slick conditions.

When the tread gets worn down, the water, snow, and other slippery substances don’t have anywhere to go except directly under your tires severely decreasing your vehicle’s traction. If your tires are nearly bald, traction will be eliminated completely. Decreased traction will negatively affect your control over the car, making the vehicle unsafe for you and your passengers. Tread depth will determine whether or not you require new tires. You can easily tell if your tires’ tread is too worn by using a penny or a quarter.

Penny Test


Tire Penny Test
The penny test is the gold standard for measuring tire tread-depth because it is easy and it works. Just take a penny and, with Lincoln’s head upside down, put it between the tread blocks of the tire. If you are not able to see the top of Lincoln’s head – if his head is “buried” between the tread blocks – then you still have more than 2/32 of an inch of tread remaining. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head, it’s time to go tire shopping because the tread is worn down to or beyond 2/32 of an inch.

Flip the penny over so that the Lincoln Memorial (pennies from 2010 and earlier will have the memorial on the back) is facing you and put the penny between the tread blocks with the memorial upside down. If the Lincoln Memorial is completely hidden, you have more than 3/32 of an inch of tread left.

Did You Know - Most state laws require tires to have a tread depth of at least 2/32" to remain in service?


The Quarter Test


Tire Quarter Test
Some automotive experts believe that using a quarter to test tire depth provides a better read than using a penny. Some independent tests have concluded that cars were able to stop faster with tires that had a little more than 4/32 of an inch of tread depth, which is the measurement the quarter test indicates. To perform the quarter test, put a quarter between the tread blocks of a tire (just like the penny test) with Washington’s head upside down, If you cannot see the top of Washington’s head, you have 4/32 of an inch of tread or more.

Did You Know - In snowy and slushy conditions, 4/32 of an inch of tread or more is necessary for good traction


For your Consideration:
Whether you go with Lincoln or Washington, both coin tests are also good ways to check to see if your tires are wearing evenly. Simply do the test between other tread blocks and if the measurements aren’t the same on all the tire treads, the tires may need to be rotated or your vehicle may require an alignment. Different types of treadwear will indicate how your tires are wearing. If you don’t have any coins handy, check to see if the tires’ wear bars are showing. Wear bars run across your tires tread pattern from the outside edge to the inside edge. If the wear bar is visible you are in need of new tires as you have hit 2/32” of an inch of tread depth. Most states consider a tire’s service life over if any point of the tread is at 2/32” or less. If you are still unsure, your local tire store can evaluate the depth of your tires.


For Those Who Fought For It...
Freedom Has A Taste The Protected Will Never Know.












  #2  
Old January 6th, 2014, 10:12 PM
skatebowd's Avatar
skatebowd skatebowd is offline

 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cantonment Florida
Posts: 5,419
Images: 247
Likes : 14
Liked 36 Times in 34 Posts
Default

also most tires now a days have wear bars in the tread. When your tread gets even with the wear bars its time to start looking for tires

click below to see my FTC Gallery


Don't forget those that came before you! Be proud of who you are and where your from.

“No damn man kills me and lives.” Confederate Lieutenant General, Nathan Bedford Forrest





  #3  
Old January 7th, 2014, 08:36 AM
JSoko's Avatar
JSoko JSoko is offline

 

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Northwest Georgia
Posts: 15,010
Images: 629
Likes : 34
Liked 187 Times in 169 Posts
Default

I see you didn't read the complete artical, comprehension is what my English teacher would say

[" If you don’t have any coins handy, check to see if the tires’ wear bars are showing. Wear bars run across your tires tread pattern from the outside edge to the inside edge. If the wear bar is visible you are in need of new tires as you have hit 2/32” of an inch of tread depth. Most states consider a tire’s service life over if any point of the tread is at 2/32” or less."]


For Those Who Fought For It...
Freedom Has A Taste The Protected Will Never Know.












  #4  
Old January 7th, 2014, 09:34 PM
catmechanic07's Avatar
catmechanic07 catmechanic07 is offline
 

Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,307
Images: 25
Likes : 61
Liked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Default

LOL..........caught red handed so to say!!!


Most commercial trucks require a min of 6/32 on steer axle tires to pass state or federal inspections. Drive tires (rear) on commercial require a min of 4/32 to pass. Trailer tires can run a min of 2/32 just because they are being pulled and are just really support for weight.

Did you also know that commercial tires hold 100psi or more psi? With 100psi on a hot summer day, a commercial tire has enough pressure if the sidewall bursts to shove a Coke machine thru a brick wall? Something to think about next time you see someone or yourself riding beside the tires of a big rig!!!

Lowriders are for guys who can't get it up!
Sissy's drive 2wd's! (you know who you are!!)




Black Sheep of FTC
  #5  
Old February 16th, 2015, 11:22 PM
pocus's Avatar
pocus pocus is offline
 

Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 29
Likes : 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Well for tread life you can see there is a limiter in every groove, but be advised that tires are good for 6-8 years from the date manufactured.
  #6  
Old February 17th, 2015, 08:38 AM
skatebowd's Avatar
skatebowd skatebowd is offline

 

Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Cantonment Florida
Posts: 5,419
Images: 247
Likes : 14
Liked 36 Times in 34 Posts
Default

actually DOT says 5 years on commercial vehicles in Florida

click below to see my FTC Gallery


Don't forget those that came before you! Be proud of who you are and where your from.

“No damn man kills me and lives.” Confederate Lieutenant General, Nathan Bedford Forrest





  #7  
Old February 17th, 2015, 09:35 PM
pocus's Avatar
pocus pocus is offline
 

Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 29
Likes : 0
Liked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by skatebowd View Post
actually DOT says 5 years on commercial vehicles in Florida
Yup your are absolutely correct... But its to expensive to change tires/wheels every 5 years, that is why as per manufacturer they would advise to replace it 6-8 yrs.


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes


(View-All Members who have read this thread : 11
ASwaff400 , bikertrash3531 , catmechanic07 , glc , JSoko , Klitch , larrhy2 , Lostin90s , pocus , Russo2 , skatebowd

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tire help geraldbaker Garage Talk: Wheels & Tires 1 June 18th, 2011 02:07 PM
Life is Tough BigT67 General Discussion
0 November 22nd, 2009 11:34 PM
Life Lesson RedHot150 General Discussion
0 June 29th, 2009 12:59 PM

Tags
life , tire , tread

Forum Jump









FordTruckClub.net is not authorized, endorsed or affiliated with the Ford Motor Company
or any of their subsidiaries. Ford® is a registered trademark of the Ford Motor Company


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6 Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.